full_screen()

Open a Sketch using the full size of the computer’s display.

Examples

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# run the code at the full dimensions of the screen currently
# selected inside the preferences window

x = 0


def setup():
    py5.full_screen()
    py5.background(0)
    py5.no_stroke()
    py5.fill(102)


def draw():
    global x
    py5.rect(x, py5.height*0.2, 1, py5.height*0.6)
    x = x + 2
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# if more than one screen is attached to the computer, run the
# code at the full dimensions on the screen defined by the
# parameter to full_screen()

x = 0


def setup():
    py5.full_screen(2)
    py5.background(0)
    py5.no_stroke()
    py5.fill(102)


def draw():
    global x
    py5.rect(x, py5.height*0.2, 1, py5.height*0.6)
    x = x + 2
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# run full screen using the P2D renderer on screen 2

x = 0


def setup():
    py5.full_screen(py5.P2D, 2)
    py5.background(0)
    py5.no_stroke()
    py5.fill(102)


def draw():
    global x
    py5.rect(x, py5.height*0.2, 1, py5.height*0.6)
    x = x + 2
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# if more than one screen is attached to the computer, run the
# code at the full dimensions across all of the attached screens

x = 0


def setup():
    py5.full_screen(py5.P2D, py5.SPAN)
    py5.background(0)
    py5.no_stroke()
    py5.fill(102)


def draw():
    global x
    py5.rect(x, py5.height*0.2, 1, py5.height*0.6)
    x = x + 2

Description

Open a Sketch using the full size of the computer’s display. This is intended to be called from the settings() function. The size() and full_screen() functions cannot both be used in the same program.

When programming in module mode and imported mode, py5 will allow calls to full_screen() from the setup() function if it is called at the beginning of setup(). This allows the user to omit the settings() function, much like what can be done while programming in the Processing IDE. Py5 does this by inspecting the setup() function and attempting to split it into synthetic settings() and setup() functions if both were not created by the user and the real setup() function contains a call to full_screen(), or calls to size(), smooth(), no_smooth(), or pixel_density(). Calls to those functions must be at the very beginning of setup(), before any other Python code (but comments are ok). This feature is not available when programming in class mode.

When full_screen() is used without a parameter on a computer with multiple monitors, it will (probably) draw the Sketch to the primary display. When it is used with a single parameter, this number defines the screen to display to program on (e.g. 1, 2, 3…). When used with two parameters, the first defines the renderer to use (e.g. P2D) and the second defines the screen. The SPAN parameter can be used in place of a screen number to draw the Sketch as a full-screen window across all of the attached displays if there are more than one.

Underlying Java method: fullScreen

Syntax

full_screen() -> None
full_screen(display: int, /) -> None
full_screen(renderer: str, /) -> None
full_screen(renderer: str, display: int, /) -> None

Parameters

  • display: int - the screen to run the Sketch on (1, 2, 3, etc. or on multiple screens using SPAN)

  • renderer: str - the renderer to use, e.g. P2D, P3D, JAVA2D (default)

Updated on September 11, 2021 16:51:34pm UTC